Whenever you’re training your dog, it’s important to get as many family members involved as possible so everyone’s on the same page. If you are telling your dog “off” when he jumps on the couch and someone else is saying “down,” while someone else is letting him hang out up there, how on earth is he ever going to learn what you want? Consistency will be the key to your success.

"Pamela's approach to dog training is one of the only few in Dallas that does not use treats to train. With this approach, your dog not only listens to you better, but longterm wise they won't keep looking at your hand or for the nearest bag of dog treats nearby to determine if they should listen to you. This has taught my dog to fully understand my commands better and build a better relationship and bonding experience between her and me based on praise training. My dog now listens to me without having to have any treats on hand or nearby."
In the twentieth century, formalized dog training originated in military and police applications, and the methods used largely reflected the military approach to training humans. In the middle and late part of the century, however, more research into operant conditioning and positive reinforcement occurred as wild animal shows became more popular. Aquatic mammal trainers used clickers (a small box that makes a loud click when pushed on) to "mark" desired behavior, giving food as a reward. The change in training methods spread gradually into the world of dog training. Today many dog trainers rely heavily on positive reinforcement to teach new behaviors.
If your dog is refusing to go over a hurdle, practice in a narrow hallway. Set up a small jump and put your dog on one side with you on the other. Your dog should have nowhere to go but forward over the jump. Encourage your pup with treats and a happy tone of voice. With a little patience and positive reinforcement, your dog will soon be a confident jumper.

The clicker is a small hand-held device that makes a distinct, short sound to mark a desired behavior. (See clicker training for a more detailed discussion of this methodology.) It has gained popularity in recent years as being a means of training that does not involve physically correcting the dog, though it may be used in conjunction with these methods.
The fur is flying, the noise is at a decibel I've never experienced before and the desire to win is so thick you can feel it. This is agility competition for dogs and Fiona, my soon to be athlete, and I are on the sidelines of an agility competition taking notes. Dogs of every breed, size and shape are jumping hurdles, running up A-frames, scampering across elevated walkways and diving through tunnels. So as not to get lost on the course, each dog is in constant eye contact with their owner who gives directions through hand signals and one-word prompts.
Changing behavior takes time. You need to have realistic expectations about changing your dog’s behavior as well as how long it will take to change behaviors that you don’t like. Often behaviors which are “normal” doggie behaviors will take the most time such as barking, digging and jumping. You also need to consider how long your dog has rehearsed the behavior. For example, if you didn’t mind that your dog jumped up on people to say hi for the last seven years and now you decide that you don’t want him to do that anymore, that behavior will take a much longer time to undo than if you had addressed it when he was a pup. Remember it’s never too late to change the behavior some will just take longer than others.
DTCDC is an all volunteer, not-for-profit club that was organized in 1974. Our mission is to promote training programs that will develop obedient and happy dogs which will be a source of pleasure and pride to their families and good canine citizens in their community. We promote responsible dog ownership through obedience and other dog related activities. Obedience classes for the public include: Puppy, Beginner, Intermediate, Novice, Open, Utility, Rally and Conformation. Our instructors are experienced and highly qualified. All classes consist of an 6 week training course, indoors and climate controlled.
In the twentieth century, formalized dog training originated in military and police applications, and the methods used largely reflected the military approach to training humans. In the middle and late part of the century, however, more research into operant conditioning and positive reinforcement occurred as wild animal shows became more popular. Aquatic mammal trainers used clickers (a small box that makes a loud click when pushed on) to "mark" desired behavior, giving food as a reward. The change in training methods spread gradually into the world of dog training. Today many dog trainers rely heavily on positive reinforcement to teach new behaviors.
Want to attend a trial? This is a good way to check out a club before you take classes. Check their events page to see if they have any trials/shows coming up. Most shows are held in parks and are open to the public. The atmosphere at most of these local trials is fun and casual. Handlers will usually be happy to answer your questions – just make sure you don’t interrupt them when they’re at the ring preparing for their run.
The clicker is a small hand-held device that makes a distinct, short sound to mark a desired behavior. (See clicker training for a more detailed discussion of this methodology.) It has gained popularity in recent years as being a means of training that does not involve physically correcting the dog, though it may be used in conjunction with these methods.

But wait, there’s more! Agility gives you something cool to do with your dog. This is important if you have a hard time getting your dog to do what you say. It teaches Fido that you are lots of fun and worth listening to. Compare this to another common activity for dogs: the dog park. At the dog park, you let him off leash and he goes off to do his own thing. Returning to you is no fun because it means he has to go home. You’re not Fido’s best buddy. You’re his chauffeur.
I felt that Hilton was able to apply various protocols to meet my dog’s needs due to his extensive background with K-9 training in the military, police, and service dog environments. Hilton demonstrates a firm hand while training, but uses positive reinforcement as well, which was needed for my dog. He ensures that you know the protocols to carry over in the home environment after training is complete. If there was any question regarding Auggie’s behaviors at home, Hilton was available by email, phone, and even conducted follow up sessions at my house.
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