All Dogs Unleashed is Dallas / Fort Worth’s premier one stop dog shop. We specialize in dog training, daycare, boarding and grooming to clean your pup up at the end of the stay. We focus on not overcrowding our facility so your dog will receive the best of care. This facility was built brand new with your pet in mind. We offer outside turf so you do not have to worry about your pet getting muddy or bothered with bugs. We also offer indoor and outdoor play areas for your pet to get the proper socialization every dog needs to be well balanced. We are also located near the airport right off 635 and George Bush making it easy to pick up and drop off your dog if you are going on a trip. Give us a call or come see our Dog Resort!
Flat collars are commonly used in clicker training and other non-correction-based training, such as puppy kindergarten. They are also effective in training small dogs, however they tend to lift the dog off the ground when giving corrections while the dog is distracted or in high adrenal mode. They are typically made of nylon or leather, and fasten with a buckle or quick-release connection.

You can start training your dog before they're of age to compete. Begin by working on basic obedience and teach your puppy to sit, lie down, come, heel, and stay. Your puppy will also benefit from attending training classes where they will learn basic obedience and get used to working around lots of other dogs and people. Having your pet take and pass the AKC Good Citizen Test is a helpful step.
Once your dog is ready to start agility training, your best bet is to find a class or group in your area. The United States Dog Agility Association (USDAA) offers a directory for agility groups in each state, and many dog trainers offer classes as well. In the classes, you will be able to introduce your dog to the obstacles without the expense of buying or building them yourself.
A-frame: The A-frame is a pair of planks joined in the middle at an angle so that they resemble the peak of the letter A. There are “contact” areas indicated by contrasting colors which are painted on the frame and dictate where the dog must step. The dog must go up one side and down the other, contacting the plank in the right places on each side.
When observing a class, take note of the dogs; do they look happy? Relaxed? Excited to work? Is the instructor encouraging dogs and owners? Does the class seem to be run in a safe and effective manner? If you don’t feel comfortable at a particular training school, your dog won’t either, and you’ll be setting Fido up to fail. Keep looking for a school where you feel comfortable; you and Fido will do your best work this way!

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Head halters are an alternative to collars that works similarly to a horse halter. The halter fits over the dog's snout and behind its head (leading it to sometimes be mistaken for a muzzle). Halters reduce the dog's ability to successfully pull on the leash, but do not eliminate it. If the halter is used with a sharp jerk on the leash, neck injury to the dog may result, but used correctly head halters have not been shown to cause harm.

Slip collars (commonly called choke chain or check chains) are made of metal links or rolled material such as nylon or leather. A metal ring is at each end. Historically, slip collars have been used as a matter of course, mostly in North America and the UK. In the last few decades use of these collars has declined. Correctly used, the collar should make a quick clicking not zipping sound when quickly snapped and released to startle or get the attention of the dog and indicate to the handler that the technique was a swift jerk not a choke. The idea is not to strangle the dog, though this can happen if the collar is improperly used.

Want to attend a trial? This is a good way to check out a club before you take classes. Check their events page to see if they have any trials/shows coming up. Most shows are held in parks and are open to the public. The atmosphere at most of these local trials is fun and casual. Handlers will usually be happy to answer your questions – just make sure you don’t interrupt them when they’re at the ring preparing for their run.


Teeter boards can be built with a long piece of wood and some PVC pipe. Mix an antiskid additive with paint and cover the entire board. This will provide your dog with more traction as he walks across the board. Purchase a large plumbing pipe from a local hardware store. Place the pipe directly in the center of the board and drill two holes in either side of the pipe. Place a carriage bolt through each of the holes and through the pipe to attach it to the board. Next, place the bolts on the inside of the holes in the pipe and tighten a nut on each bolt to hold them together.
Most training schools are happy to allow you to attend and observe (leave Fido at home for this) a class or two to be sure the style of instruction fits with your beliefs. Dogs learn best through progressive reinforcement training; rewarding the dog for making the right choice and withholding rewards, or ignoring the dog for making an incorrect choice.
DTCDC is an all volunteer, not-for-profit club that was organized in 1974. Our mission is to promote training programs that will develop obedient and happy dogs which will be a source of pleasure and pride to their families and good canine citizens in their community. We promote responsible dog ownership through obedience and other dog related activities. Obedience classes for the public include: Puppy, Beginner, Intermediate, Novice, Open, Utility, Rally and Conformation. Our instructors are experienced and highly qualified. All classes consist of an 6 week training course, indoors and climate controlled.
Our training will give you the best opportunity to be successful and lead a very happy and rewarding life with your dog. The most amazing part is to watch as your confidence grows as the training progresses; from a person who has been stressed out their entire time they’ve had their dog, to stress-free. We can take your guilt or embarrassment your dog may be causing and turn that into pride and happiness. 
Prong collars must never be turned inside out (with the prongs facing away from the dog's skin), as this may cause injury against the body and head. [1] Plastic tips are occasionally placed on the ends of the prongs to protect against tufts forming in the fur or, in the case of low quality manufactured collars with rough chisel cut ends, puncturing the skin. Like the slip collar, the prong collar is placed high on the dog's neck, just behind the ears, at the most sensitive point.[2]
"Chris really knows dogs and treated all 3 of ours as individuals. The reason I wanted a trainer at first was because my Sammie (Lab mix) was 1 year old and she was thinking she was still a little puppy ( 47 lbs of arms and legs and stubborn will). Walking her was stressful and she went CRAZY at any distraction. Chris taught me, my boyfriend Carlos, AND Sam what to do to get her to be a positive family member. All three dogs listened in different visits and we have the tools to go forward. Defiantly worth the money. Thanks Chris!"
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